Jersey City’s Labor Intensive Sewer Remodeling

Apr 20

Jersey City’s Labor Intensive Sewer Remodeling

In many cities along the Jersey Shore, sewer infrastructures are being upgraded and redesigned to accommodate growth and an overworked sewer system, which can give rise to various nuisances. Currently, Jersey City is on the assignment of replacing 1,900 feet of sewer on Sixth St. from Grove to Monmouth streets. The $4.2 million project, which began several months ago, is to be completed by summer’s end. The line replacement is just one of $94 million in water and sewer enrichment projects planned throughout the next couple of years. This work will include the replacement or repair of 28,500 feet of sewer lines citywide.  $49 million of the allotted funds for this overhaul will be spent improving the water system.  The list of projects include the installation of a new 8,600-foot main from the southwest section of the city to Newport; cleaning and lining 18,800 feet of water mains north of Journal Square; and replacing 30 large valves citywide. In surrounding cities, such as Camden, problematic combined sewer overflows are among the worst. Even an inch of rain can create a backup of raw sewage up into homes, streets and parks. Camden is trying to reduce its volume of storm water by creating more porous surfaces. Over the last three years, a Camden anti-flooding task force built 32 rain gardens, freshly planted green spaces, to let more rainwater infiltrate into the ground, instead of entering overburdened pipes. Collectively, Camden’s rain gardens soak up 3 million gallons of rainwater a year. Fun advisory: looking for a refreshing spring event? Come out to Bally’s Park Place Boardwalk! The New Jersey Water Environment Association will have their 1st annual ‘Escape the Effluent’ 5K Fun Run/Walk being held on May...

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Atlantic City’s Sponsored Infrastructure Program

Apr 01

Atlantic City’s Sponsored Infrastructure Program

The New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Financing Plan is a revolving loan program administered by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. This investment strategy provides loans to local agencies for the construction of wastewater treatment facilities, sludge management systems for wastewater and water treatment systems, combined sewer overflow reduction and other non-point source management projects. The subsidy also provides loans for the construction of distribution systems, storage facilities, and source development. Funds are made available under the federal Clean Water Act and various state bond acts. Since the approval of the loan program, more than $1.5 billion in state and federal funds have been awarded. Wastewater and storm water projects eligible for infrastructure financial allowances include wastewater treatment plant upgrades or improvements; facilities for the treatment and disposal or beneficial reuse of sewage and water treatment system sludges; collection and conveyance facilities; on-site system rehabilitation; infiltration/inflow correction and combined sewer overflow projects. Also eligible are non-point source management projects such as storm water basins, equipment purchases and streambank stabilization. Save the Dates: Perma-Liner Industries has a lineup of events for you to attend!  All are invited to come to one, or if you’re adventurous, all of our LIVE DEMOS coming up in April and May. You can go to www.perma-liner.com to register and find out more but first…here are the dates and locations to save: We’ll be in Dallas April 5th, Seattle April 27th, Chicago May 4th and Philadelphia May 18th. You can expect to have our knowledgeable staff showing you the latest CIPP technology. We want to see you there! Atlantic City Installers, please take note- this is an EXCLUSIVE INVITATION FOR PERMA-LINER™ CERTIFIED INSTALLERS. Perma-Liner Industries is offering our Quarterly Refresher Training: Perma-Lateral™ Lining-held at our Clearwater facility TUESDAY, APRIL 5TH & WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6TH. Please register. www.perma-liner.com/...

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Sea Girt Pump Station Solution

Oct 09

Sea Girt Pump Station Solution

Among the most devastating effects of Superstorm Sandy in New Jersey was the storm’s impact on sewage treatment facilities along the coast. During and after the storm, sewage plants and pump station were inundated by flood waters and without power for as long as three days, resulting in the discharge of some two billion gallons of untreated and partially treated sewage into New Jersey waterways. The environmental damage was unprecedented – and the financial impact was devastating. Total costs to repair and reconstruct the damaged sewage treatment facilities now top more than $100 million. Sewage treatment authorities throughout the state have acted to reduce the risk of a similar disaster. The majority of the Authority’s sewage pump stations were constructed and placed into operation in the 1970s. But in Sea Girt, the authority converted an existing facility constructed in the 1900s. By 2006, that facility had outlived its useful life and the Authority made plans to replace it. The Sea Girt pump station had been flooded in the past, and the likelihood was high that it would experience repeated flooding. While the Authority considered relocating the facility, that idea was not feasible because of the cost, permitting restrictions and the lack of available land in the heavily residential community.  Electrical and control connections between the enclosure and the pump station and its equipment are made with cables and plugs that can be opened to allow removal of the enclosure.  The Sea Girt Pump station withstood the assault by Hurricane Sandy, a 100-year storm. Today, the Authority is implementing the mobile trailer plan at its Pitney pump station and will relocate its Spring Lake station outside of the 100-year flood zone, preventing a repeat of the environmental damage and expense that occurred as a result of...

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