Small New Jersey Township Creates Big Changes to Water Infrastructures

Jul 14

Small New Jersey Township Creates Big Changes to Water Infrastructures

Sussex County New Jersey has come up with a master plan to help with the township landfill, as well as sewage collection process. The outdated plan used a collection tank -capable of holding a million gallons of liquid- bringing it to the collection facility. But new procedures have been implemented to do away with the old, making way for the new. Now, with new techniques, and raising the landfill to higher ground, the facility has been given over 40 more years of usefulness. Additionally, a new pipeline will be installed, bringing the system and processes up to date. The total financing cost for the project is expected to save up to $8 million, over trucking the liquid that drains from the landfill. In a modern landfill, a water-resistant liner is put in the bottom of the landfill and the garbage and trash are piled in. The weight of additional trash, along with gravity, causes liquids in the garbage to collect in the bottom of the landfill where it is piped to a storage tank. The project involves laying a four-inch pipeline, with one end of the pipe connected to the current collection tank and the other end going into a sewer main. The liquid will be pumped through the system, using fewer energy resources. Residents can expect construction to begin next spring, with the pipeline completed by the end of next year. More sewer news:  The Water Company is beginning a pipeline replacement project (along South Finley Avenue) in the Township of Basking Ridge. The water pipes at the intersection of West Oak Street are decades old and in need of replacement. The project is expected to finish within three months. Street closures during construction will be limited to a specific work area. Contact Perma-Liner Industries today for all of your pipelining...

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Cities in New Jersey are Reinventing Water Infrastructures

Jun 17

Cities in New Jersey are Reinventing Water Infrastructures

New Jersey has rapidly adapted to many changes within the water infrastructure culture. There have been many important discussions and actions taken on behalf of water quality for communities and neighborhoods in the state. The ability to deliver top grade water to homes is being challenged by an infrastructure that is in varying states of disrepair and collapse. Water is lost at a rate of approximately 20 percent through leaky pipes. It is estimated that the cost to upgrade the infrastructure will be $40 billion over the next 20 years. The city of Hoboken is one of the cities that Jersey Water Works points to as an innovator with its award-winning Rebuild by Design flood prevention plan. The city of Camden is also in the process of rehabilitating the existing infrastructure in order to alleviate the pressure on the system. New Jersey, on a whole, has been successful in the implementation of environmentally friendly areas, such as parks and other facilities, which provide green access and waterfront access reducing the combined sewerage flooding. New Jersey residents have grown accustomed to paying pennies per gallon, even as many of the pipes and pumps and treatment plants that convey that water fall into disrepair. At a penny per gallon, times two gallons per minute for a 10-minute shower, the consumer currently pays about 20 cents. If rates increase to cover infrastructure costs, the same shower may soon cost $2. That’s 50 percent more than the average total bill for New Jersey customers. Coming soon: Perma-liner Industries is busy making plans for you. We’re planning a “Trenchless Tour” on July 27th in the New England area. We’ll be posting more information on this spectacular event…stay...

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Jersey City’s Labor Intensive Sewer Remodeling

Apr 20

Jersey City’s Labor Intensive Sewer Remodeling

In many cities along the Jersey Shore, sewer infrastructures are being upgraded and redesigned to accommodate growth and an overworked sewer system, which can give rise to various nuisances. Currently, Jersey City is on the assignment of replacing 1,900 feet of sewer on Sixth St. from Grove to Monmouth streets. The $4.2 million project, which began several months ago, is to be completed by summer’s end. The line replacement is just one of $94 million in water and sewer enrichment projects planned throughout the next couple of years. This work will include the replacement or repair of 28,500 feet of sewer lines citywide.  $49 million of the allotted funds for this overhaul will be spent improving the water system.  The list of projects include the installation of a new 8,600-foot main from the southwest section of the city to Newport; cleaning and lining 18,800 feet of water mains north of Journal Square; and replacing 30 large valves citywide. In surrounding cities, such as Camden, problematic combined sewer overflows are among the worst. Even an inch of rain can create a backup of raw sewage up into homes, streets and parks. Camden is trying to reduce its volume of storm water by creating more porous surfaces. Over the last three years, a Camden anti-flooding task force built 32 rain gardens, freshly planted green spaces, to let more rainwater infiltrate into the ground, instead of entering overburdened pipes. Collectively, Camden’s rain gardens soak up 3 million gallons of rainwater a year. Fun advisory: looking for a refreshing spring event? Come out to Bally’s Park Place Boardwalk! The New Jersey Water Environment Association will have their 1st annual ‘Escape the Effluent’ 5K Fun Run/Walk being held on May...

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Longport: Small Town, Big Plans for Conservation

Feb 24

Longport: Small Town, Big Plans for Conservation

Longport is populated with just under 900 residents.  It is a small, quaint town just a stone’s throw from Atlantic City. This tiny borough is facing high water usage which has recently become a concern making it necessary to seek out a means for conservation of water and reduce stress on an aging water system. Longport is hoping to stave off expensive infrastructure repairs, something that can be a particular burden to municipal water systems that lack the massive capital of big private systems such as New Jersey American Water. After Superstorm Sandy, there were a lot of pipes that needed to be replaced or repaired due to settlement from flooding. Within the last several years, the Water Department has spent $775 million on water system upgrades.  Longport is currently in the process of replacing 8,100 feet of aging water main in Ocean City from 12th to 15th streets. Residents now have a fixed service charge of $13.60 per month. In the Wildwoods, which have shared a single municipal water utility among the four towns since the early 1900s, rates are calculated quarterly and include a fixed service charge of $24.85 per quarter. Conservation efforts expected to be in place this year include increasing the amount of times per year the meter is read (currently once a year), going to even/odd lawn-watering days and regulation of new landscaping. Atlantic City, did you know that a program is underway to protect homeowners from future flood and storm damage called Restore the Shore? Qualifying participants can apply for up to $30,000 in Reimbursement Grants. The program is entitled the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Elevation Program. This is a FEMA-funded reimbursement program designed to assist homeowners in affected communities with the elevation of their primary single-family residences to meet requirements of the flood insurance risk maps and State and local...

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