Flooding and Drought: A Proportionate Concern for New Jersey Counties

Apr 06

Flooding and Drought: A Proportionate Concern for New Jersey Counties

Spring has arrived and along with this change of seasons brings a continued concern for drought conditions for many counties within New Jersey.  A collection of data taken in recent months suggests that several reservoirs have fallen well below capacity. Several cities did not get as much snow and rain as it needed during the winter, but the good news is the rain and snow that did occur helped boost the overall water storage levels to nearly 90 percent capacity. However, the cities located in low-lying areas have a different concern-flooding. Many cities are making adjustments to their infrastructure systems in order to better prepare for future storms. Recently, Middlesex County began the construction of a 1,700-foot flood wall. Upon completion the wall is anticipated to reach up to 21 feet above sea level. This is one of many future planned initiatives to assist the state in its resiliency objective in order to be adequately prepared during major storm surges. The funding for these projects is assisted through the Statewide Assistance Infrastructure Loan program which is expressly for the purpose of providing aid for disaster relief projects. The Township is in the process of planning helpful seminars, as well as workshops, to inform local residents on how storm water runoff and flash flooding affect the environment.  The workshops will outline a strategy and detail a long-term control plan on prioritizing several green infrastructure initiatives. Interestingly, a recent evaluation of Best Management Practices for Green infrastructure shows green roofs to have the most expensive capital while also having one of the lowest maintenance costs. Additional County investments will also include projects for enhanced water infrastructure initiatives. Interesting fact: A showerhead leaking at 10 drips per minute wastes more than 500 gallons per year. That’s the amount of water it takes to wash 60 loads of dishes in your dishwasher....

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Cities in New Jersey are Reinventing Water Infrastructures

Jun 17

Cities in New Jersey are Reinventing Water Infrastructures

New Jersey has rapidly adapted to many changes within the water infrastructure culture. There have been many important discussions and actions taken on behalf of water quality for communities and neighborhoods in the state. The ability to deliver top grade water to homes is being challenged by an infrastructure that is in varying states of disrepair and collapse. Water is lost at a rate of approximately 20 percent through leaky pipes. It is estimated that the cost to upgrade the infrastructure will be $40 billion over the next 20 years. The city of Hoboken is one of the cities that Jersey Water Works points to as an innovator with its award-winning Rebuild by Design flood prevention plan. The city of Camden is also in the process of rehabilitating the existing infrastructure in order to alleviate the pressure on the system. New Jersey, on a whole, has been successful in the implementation of environmentally friendly areas, such as parks and other facilities, which provide green access and waterfront access reducing the combined sewerage flooding. New Jersey residents have grown accustomed to paying pennies per gallon, even as many of the pipes and pumps and treatment plants that convey that water fall into disrepair. At a penny per gallon, times two gallons per minute for a 10-minute shower, the consumer currently pays about 20 cents. If rates increase to cover infrastructure costs, the same shower may soon cost $2. That’s 50 percent more than the average total bill for New Jersey customers. Coming soon: Perma-liner Industries is busy making plans for you. We’re planning a “Trenchless Tour” on July 27th in the New England area. We’ll be posting more information on this spectacular event…stay...

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Atlantic City’s Sponsored Infrastructure Program

Apr 01

Atlantic City’s Sponsored Infrastructure Program

The New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Financing Plan is a revolving loan program administered by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. This investment strategy provides loans to local agencies for the construction of wastewater treatment facilities, sludge management systems for wastewater and water treatment systems, combined sewer overflow reduction and other non-point source management projects. The subsidy also provides loans for the construction of distribution systems, storage facilities, and source development. Funds are made available under the federal Clean Water Act and various state bond acts. Since the approval of the loan program, more than $1.5 billion in state and federal funds have been awarded. Wastewater and storm water projects eligible for infrastructure financial allowances include wastewater treatment plant upgrades or improvements; facilities for the treatment and disposal or beneficial reuse of sewage and water treatment system sludges; collection and conveyance facilities; on-site system rehabilitation; infiltration/inflow correction and combined sewer overflow projects. Also eligible are non-point source management projects such as storm water basins, equipment purchases and streambank stabilization. Save the Dates: Perma-Liner Industries has a lineup of events for you to attend!  All are invited to come to one, or if you’re adventurous, all of our LIVE DEMOS coming up in April and May. You can go to www.perma-liner.com to register and find out more but first…here are the dates and locations to save: We’ll be in Dallas April 5th, Seattle April 27th, Chicago May 4th and Philadelphia May 18th. You can expect to have our knowledgeable staff showing you the latest CIPP technology. We want to see you there! Atlantic City Installers, please take note- this is an EXCLUSIVE INVITATION FOR PERMA-LINER™ CERTIFIED INSTALLERS. Perma-Liner Industries is offering our Quarterly Refresher Training: Perma-Lateral™ Lining-held at our Clearwater facility TUESDAY, APRIL 5TH & WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6TH. Please register. www.perma-liner.com/...

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Longport: Small Town, Big Plans for Conservation

Feb 24

Longport: Small Town, Big Plans for Conservation

Longport is populated with just under 900 residents.  It is a small, quaint town just a stone’s throw from Atlantic City. This tiny borough is facing high water usage which has recently become a concern making it necessary to seek out a means for conservation of water and reduce stress on an aging water system. Longport is hoping to stave off expensive infrastructure repairs, something that can be a particular burden to municipal water systems that lack the massive capital of big private systems such as New Jersey American Water. After Superstorm Sandy, there were a lot of pipes that needed to be replaced or repaired due to settlement from flooding. Within the last several years, the Water Department has spent $775 million on water system upgrades.  Longport is currently in the process of replacing 8,100 feet of aging water main in Ocean City from 12th to 15th streets. Residents now have a fixed service charge of $13.60 per month. In the Wildwoods, which have shared a single municipal water utility among the four towns since the early 1900s, rates are calculated quarterly and include a fixed service charge of $24.85 per quarter. Conservation efforts expected to be in place this year include increasing the amount of times per year the meter is read (currently once a year), going to even/odd lawn-watering days and regulation of new landscaping. Atlantic City, did you know that a program is underway to protect homeowners from future flood and storm damage called Restore the Shore? Qualifying participants can apply for up to $30,000 in Reimbursement Grants. The program is entitled the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Elevation Program. This is a FEMA-funded reimbursement program designed to assist homeowners in affected communities with the elevation of their primary single-family residences to meet requirements of the flood insurance risk maps and State and local...

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