New Jersey’s Top Universities Launch Flooding Prevention Project

Jun 06

New Jersey’s Top Universities Launch Flooding Prevention Project

New Jersey is home to several outstanding universities, many of which are on a path to leading sustainable causes. From the time that Superstorm Sandy occurred, renowned Universities such as Princeton and Rutgers have made continuous efforts to protect the vulnerable areas of their nearby and respective cities. An initiative currently in process is aimed specifically at controlling the flooding which surfaces in low-lying terrain. An important part of the University project consists of installing rain gardens and rain barrels to block rainwater, an underground stormwater detention basin, as well as extensive wetland restoration. The Students have also designed several other green infrastructure projects. The first is a 50-by-40-foot depression in the ground with 500 plants and 30 shrubs. This is a 2,000 square-foot garden that can handle nearly 15,000 gallons of water. One of the rain gardens was designed to capture and treat stormwater runoff from Memorial Field Park near Tremley Point. The second rain garden, which is approximately 200 feet long and 15 feet wide, will collect runoff from a parking lot and baseball field in Memorial Field Park. This particular garden can capture up to 22,500 gallons of water. Sewer work advisory for Princeton: A Snowden Lane Sewer Project has recently begun and here’s what you can expect when traveling in the area of construction-Snowden Lane, between Barbara Smoyer Park and the stream culvert near the intersection of Overbrook Drive will only be affected in the southbound lane due to a sanitary sewer pipe installation. During the process, Snowden Lane will be closed to through traffic between Herrontown Road and Overbrook Drive. Signs will be visible and work will be conducted during the day, beginning at 7 am. Atlantic City, have you made your plans to attend our Open House? We hope so! It’s in Anaheim, CA and your presence is requested! The Perma-Liner Industries Event will consist of three fun-filled days, chock-full of live demonstrations and information on all of the CIPP technology available. It’s taking place from June 13th-15th. Don’t miss this! Call us to confirm your reservation @ 1-866-336-2568. See you...

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Flooding and Drought: A Proportionate Concern for New Jersey Counties

Apr 06

Flooding and Drought: A Proportionate Concern for New Jersey Counties

Spring has arrived and along with this change of seasons brings a continued concern for drought conditions for many counties within New Jersey.  A collection of data taken in recent months suggests that several reservoirs have fallen well below capacity. Several cities did not get as much snow and rain as it needed during the winter, but the good news is the rain and snow that did occur helped boost the overall water storage levels to nearly 90 percent capacity. However, the cities located in low-lying areas have a different concern-flooding. Many cities are making adjustments to their infrastructure systems in order to better prepare for future storms. Recently, Middlesex County began the construction of a 1,700-foot flood wall. Upon completion the wall is anticipated to reach up to 21 feet above sea level. This is one of many future planned initiatives to assist the state in its resiliency objective in order to be adequately prepared during major storm surges. The funding for these projects is assisted through the Statewide Assistance Infrastructure Loan program which is expressly for the purpose of providing aid for disaster relief projects. The Township is in the process of planning helpful seminars, as well as workshops, to inform local residents on how storm water runoff and flash flooding affect the environment.  The workshops will outline a strategy and detail a long-term control plan on prioritizing several green infrastructure initiatives. Interestingly, a recent evaluation of Best Management Practices for Green infrastructure shows green roofs to have the most expensive capital while also having one of the lowest maintenance costs. Additional County investments will also include projects for enhanced water infrastructure initiatives. Interesting fact: A showerhead leaking at 10 drips per minute wastes more than 500 gallons per year. That’s the amount of water it takes to wash 60 loads of dishes in your dishwasher....

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New Jersey Cities Work Together to Improve Local Water Infrastructures

Jan 23

New Jersey Cities Work Together to Improve Local Water Infrastructures

Many cities throughout New Jersey are becoming more attune to the recommendations and benefits of sewer sustainable initiatives. Cities such as Newark, Camden, and Trenton have been awarded green bonds, or funding, to exhibit conscientiousness toward the need for green infrastructures.  The state has recently issued infrastructure bonds as “green bonds” to promote and amplify its commitment to financing water quality infrastructure projects that enhance water resources and protect public health.  Residents of communities across the state are doing their part by volunteering their time and energies in order to clean up local shorelines, rivers and creeks in the New York-New Jersey harbor estuary. Additionally, municipalities are participating in a certification program to promote water infrastructure best practices. Municipalities will be able to receive points for conducting a water loss audit, developing a green infrastructure plan and installing green infrastructure practices within their municipalities. A workshop dedicated to educating on this initiative will be scheduled for early February. A review of the new water infrastructure actions within the certification program will take place concurrently. The city of Hoboken has also recently announced its plan to develop the first Capital Improvement Plan- for intermediate and longer-term investments- in its water distribution system. The Improvement Plan will provide a well-planned approach that optimizes the funding required to maintain water systems in a state of good repair. The city will evaluate and recommend options for managing Hoboken’s water infrastructure and develop a sustainable financial implementation strategy. More strategies close to home: Thomas Edison State University is helping develop a Water Infrastructure Committee of their own. Specifically, as an objective to improve the water infrastructure systems in urban communities. The primary goal of the Water Infrastructure Committee will be to foster awareness regarding combined sewer overflows, as well as identify funding sources and best practices in the management of aging water...

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Cities in New Jersey are Reinventing Water Infrastructures

Jun 17

Cities in New Jersey are Reinventing Water Infrastructures

New Jersey has rapidly adapted to many changes within the water infrastructure culture. There have been many important discussions and actions taken on behalf of water quality for communities and neighborhoods in the state. The ability to deliver top grade water to homes is being challenged by an infrastructure that is in varying states of disrepair and collapse. Water is lost at a rate of approximately 20 percent through leaky pipes. It is estimated that the cost to upgrade the infrastructure will be $40 billion over the next 20 years. The city of Hoboken is one of the cities that Jersey Water Works points to as an innovator with its award-winning Rebuild by Design flood prevention plan. The city of Camden is also in the process of rehabilitating the existing infrastructure in order to alleviate the pressure on the system. New Jersey, on a whole, has been successful in the implementation of environmentally friendly areas, such as parks and other facilities, which provide green access and waterfront access reducing the combined sewerage flooding. New Jersey residents have grown accustomed to paying pennies per gallon, even as many of the pipes and pumps and treatment plants that convey that water fall into disrepair. At a penny per gallon, times two gallons per minute for a 10-minute shower, the consumer currently pays about 20 cents. If rates increase to cover infrastructure costs, the same shower may soon cost $2. That’s 50 percent more than the average total bill for New Jersey customers. Coming soon: Perma-liner Industries is busy making plans for you. We’re planning a “Trenchless Tour” on July 27th in the New England area. We’ll be posting more information on this spectacular event…stay...

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The Environmental Infrastructure Financing Program

Dec 14

The Environmental Infrastructure Financing Program

The EIFP (Environmental Infrastructure Financing Program) is a partnership between the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and the New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Trust, providing low-interest loans for environmental infrastructure projects. Since 1988 the clean water and drinking water components of the EIFP have awarded more than $5.7 billion in loans throughout the State.  Recently, 952 of the 1179 funded projects totaling more than $4.6 billion in construction costs have been completed, have initiated operations, and have been administratively closed out; 227 projects totaling slightly more than $1.1 billion in project costs are actively contracting or under construction. Assistance recipients must certify that it has studied cost-effectiveness, and has selected a project with the greatest potential for water reuse, water conservation, and energy conservation. The Department reserved 50% of the available principal forgiveness funds and provide principal forgiveness loans for Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) abatement projects utilizing green practices (such as green roofs, blue roofs, rain gardens, porous pavement, and other activities that maintain and restore natural hydrology by infiltrating, and harvesting and using stormwater) and for integrated water resources planning. For all new projects, the Financing Package includes an interest-free loan from the Department for up to 75% of the allowable project costs and a market-rate loan from the Trust for the remaining allowable costs. Atlantic City, Perma-liner Industries has some exciting information that must be shared now as time is of the essence! It’s the Section 179 Deduction. This allows businesses to deduct the full purchase price of qualifying equipment and/or software purchased or financed during the tax year. That means that if you buy (or lease) a piece of qualifying equipment, you can deduct the FULL PURCHASE PRICE from your gross income. Give us a call so we can offer you our very best products and services now.  1-866-336-2568/...

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